NIH Open Access Policy Update

nihThe NIH Public Access Policy will continue to be in effect in 2009 and “thereafter,” according to a provision in the recently approved federal appropriations bill.

“The Director of the National Institutes of Health shall require in the current fiscal year and thereafter [emphasis added] that all investigators funded by the NIH submit or have submitted for them to the National Library of Medicine’s PubMed Central an electronic version their final, peer-reviewed manuscripts upon acceptance for publication, to be made publicly available no later than 12 months after the official date of publication: provided, That the NIH shall implement the public access policy in a manner consistent with copyright law.”

The NIH Revised Policy on Enhancing Public Access requires eligible NIH-funded researchers to deposit electronic copies of their peer-reviewed manuscripts into PubMed Central. Full texts of the articles are then made publicly available online in PubMed Central no later than 12 months after publication in a journal. Nature reports in its online News section that the “Open-access policy flourishes at NIH,” (April 7, 2009.) [http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/458690a]

The Dana Medical Library presentation NIH Public Access: Submissions, copyright, and compliance is available for UVM and FAHC audiences. If you would like to schedule this presentation for your own department, lab, or other group please contact Donna.Omalley@uvm.edu. Information from the presentation is also available on the Dana Medical Library web site: NIH Public Access Policy [http://danaguides.uvm.edu/NIHPublicAccess].

Personal Health Tools

floss1Ever wonder about the proper way to floss your teeth? The personal health tools at healthfinder.gov can show you how to floss, assess your risk of diabetes or calculate how much you spend on alcohol each month.

healthfinder.gov is a government Web site that presents health information and tools for individual use, either for yourself or a loved one. According to the site’s description it “has resources on a wide range of health topics selected from over 1,600 government and non-profit organizations to bring you the best, most reliable health information on the Internet.”

One of the most interesting sections of the site contains a variety of personal health tools, “free interactive tools to check your health, get personalized advice, and keep track of your progress.” A great place to start is the MyHealthfinder, which offers you several tools of interest based on your age and gender [information provided byU.S. Preventive Services Task Force].

While MedlinePlus is still the gold standard in consumer health information, it often works best when you approach it with a particular topic in mind. On the other hand, if you are looking for personalized general wellness information, either for yourself or your patients, healthfinder.gov is a great place to start.

Floss those pearly whites! by /*dave*/ used in accordance with the Creative Commons license.

New Technologies in the Library

Enhanced Catalog Featurebooks_sm2

You may have noticed that the catalog has more images and more information than before. That’s because information from Google Book Search has been loaded into UVM Libraries’ online catalog, Voyager.

booksvoyager

More Information About This Book

Many of the books in the catalog now have an image of the cover of the book, and a link to More Information About This Book. Click on that link and you will be brought to that particular book’s entry within Google Book Search. Once there, you may see some of these features:

  • images of the cover,
  • the table of contents,
  • reviews,
  • publisher descriptions
  • and even a chance to preview the book.

In a survey of UVM Libraries catalog users, 92% agreed or strongly agreed that the link to Google Books provided useful information.

cell-phoneText It!

A common scenario: you need a book from the library so you scribble the call number on a gum wrapper you find in your pocket. You are now on the 3rd floor of Bailey-Howe or standing at the front of the Dana Medical Library only to discover that your book bag has now eaten that gum wrapper.

Next time, TEXT IT! UVM Libraries catalog now has a texting option within each record that will send your cell phone an abbreviated title and location information. Charges from your cell phone carrier may apply.

New Printing Options For Laptopslaptop_stickers3

We’re pleased to announce that Windows laptop users can now print directly to Libraries’ printers.

Install the printers for your library of choice (Bailey/Howe, Dana Medical Library, or Cook Chemistry/Physics Library) and you’ll be good to go.

Laptop printing solutions for Macintosh and Vista users are currently under development.

Laptop Stickers by Roo Reynolds used in accordance with the Creative Commons license.

Dana Wants to Hear from YOU!

libqual_logo_100px_highThe Dana Medical Library cares about what you think. We want your voice to be at the heart of our planning and assessment efforts as we evaluate library services, including such things as electronic journal access, library employees’ ability to solve problems, the new library web page, and the quality of the physical facilities.

On Monday, April 6th, Dana will launch an electronic survey, LibQUAL+ ™, to evaluate the library, and to benchmark our collection, services and facilities with other libraries.

LibQual is a nationally-normed survey developed by the Texas A&M University Libraries in partnership with the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). The survey gauges library users’ opinions of the resources and services provided by the library. The survey includes three general areas: Affect of Service, or how patrons felt their needs were met by staff; Information Control, or how easily patrons are able to find what they are looking for; and Library as Place, or how well the location works for study and research.

The Dana Medical Library participated in the LibQUAL+ ™ survey in April 2005. At that time, the Library’s highest ratings were in the area of Affect of Service. The area of Information Control presented a different picture. Three out of 9 questions reflected inadequate performance. For example, in answer to the question of whether journal collections were sufficient for one’s work, respondents, particularly faculty and graduate students, rated the collection as inadequate. The physical Library was also identified as below standard. Since that time, the Dana Medical Library has made several changes. Most obviously, the Library moved to a new facility. Another important change has been the significant increase in the number of electronic journals available. How important are these changes? What additional changes should be considered? What should not be changed? We want to know!

Please consider participating in this survey at http://library.uvm.edu/surveys/. Sample responses indicate it takes approximately 10 minutes to complete.

Your investment of time now will be greatly appreciated, and will help to shape the future of the Dana Medical Library.

Free Online Resources for Alumni & Non-UVM Clinicians

freeresources1

With the recent launch of the new Dana Medical Library website, http://library.uvm.edu/dana/, many of the helpful subject-based web resource guides have also been updated.

The featured guide this month is the Free Resources to Support Clinical Care guide, a collection of websites that do not require a UVM affiliation. Alumni, healthcare providers in the general community, and anyone at all can make use of this guide and its collection of clinical resources.

The major category headings are:

  • E-Journals that are freely available online
  • E-Books collections
  • Drugs & Toxicology resources,
  • Clinical Evidence & Medical Literature resources, as well as
  • Patient Education & Public Health, and a section for physician social networking.

The guide is a work in progress and will be updated regularly. Feedback to keep the site fresh and relevant is appreciated. Email Claire.LaForce@uvm.edu directly.

Find Out More About Top Ranking Journals

jcrhdr

Are you thinking of submitting a manuscript to Plant Cell but don’t know how high that journal is ranked in your field? Do you want to know more about the top journals in your field?

Journal Citation Reports can help! This resource allows you to evaluate and compare journals using citation data drawn from over 7,500 scholarly and technical journals from 3,300 publishers in over 60 countries. It covers the areas of science, technology and the social sciences. Journal Citation Reports displays the:

  • Most frequently cited journals in a field
  • Highest impact journals in a field
  • Largest journals in a field

Citation and article counts may indicate how frequently current researchers are using individual journals. By tabulating and aggregating citation and article counts, JCR offers one perspective for journal evaluation and comparison.

To use JCR, simply click on Articles & Databases on the home page and then go to Web of Science. Once there, click on the yellow tab at the top that reads Additional Resources. A link to Journal Citation Reports is in the upper left-hand corner.

Be aware that JCR is not the only way to evaluate a journal’s value or impact on a field. ISI, the makers of JCR, offer valuable advice on using this resource wisely, so consider reading this before you proceed.

Celebrating 10 years of Service to Middlebury Area Hospital

porter“It’s a great service to pick up the phone and get what you need,” says Elaine Coon, coordinator of education services at Porter Medical Center, a small hospital that serves the health care needs of Middlebury, VT and surrounding communities.

Ten years ago, the Dana Medical Library started sending a librarian to Porter Medical Center  for assistance with a variety of information needs. In the beginning, the librarian answered research questions and helped develop and catalog the hospital’s small book collection. As the information environment changed however, Dana librarians have taken on management of electronic journals, the creation, maintenance and hosting of Porter’s own library web site, and more of an educational role to elevate the health literacy of Porter’s employees.

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Angie Chapple-Sokol, Assistant Library Professor and Librarian for Porter Medical Center.

Dana’s contract with Porter Hospital agrees to provide literature searches, inter library loans, and articles to nurses, physicians, and administrators at Porter. In addition, the contract librarian agrees to develop and teach classes, provide educational materials to Porter staff, and facilitate the physical processing of new materials. Administrative oversight, such as collection development and management of electronic content contracts, web site production and hosting, and promotion of products and services for the library, is provided for in the contract as well.
Recent activities and accomplishments at Porter include a completely redesigned web site, two successfully negotiated contracts for clinical point-of-care databases, educational sessions on topics ranging from “What is Evidence-Based Practice?” to “Finding Good Patient Information on the Web,” and a journal research project that will help determine the future of many of Porter’s subscriptions.

Elaine Coon is Dana’s regular contact at Porter, and she has only good things to say.  She appreciates having input on collection development, and the exposure to current technologies and databases. “It’s just great to be able to talk to a librarian,” she says, “It’s important to have a liaison and face to the Dana Library.”

Community Medical School Is Back for Its 10th Year


cms_brochure_final_sp09-133x205The Community Medical School lecture series began in 1998 and was designed to provide people in the community with an opportunity to share in the medical learning experience. Offered each semester, Community Medical School consists of seven weekly lectures on such diverse subjects as heart failure, DNA, food allergies, asthma, melanoma, stem cell transplants, coronary artery bypass surgery and incontinence. Each lecture is videotaped for distribution to libraries and to public access cable television stations around the state.

Past lectures on DVD can be found in the Dana Medical Library’s consumer health collection. Dana-created supplemental reading lists for past lectures are also available.

For more information about Community Medical School, call (802) 847-2886.

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