Dana’s Main Desk: A Central Location for all Library Services

WordleImage resized LARGEFor those of you returning from break or beginning your journey as a student, faculty member or medical professional, all the services that you expect from your medical library are available to you through the Main Desk:

The Main Desk is the source for answers to a wide range of questions. Switching to a single service location maximizes library space and better serves patron needs while becoming the central point for help, information, and services at the Library. Stop at the Main Desk to find an e-journal or get started on a PubMed or CatQuest search on your topic!

The Main Desk is the place to go for curriculum support. Access and place materials on reserve, request articles through electronic article delivery and interlibrary loan, gain support for research, get help with database navigation and reserve group study spaces. Also, check out books, media and print journals and borrow supplies like ethernet & power cables, standup desks, white boards & markers, and headphones.

Get help with technology for printing, scanning, copying, public computers, wireless access, and referral to external IT support. In addition, the library has a lost and found and can provide emergency cleanup supplies.

A medical librarian is at hand for research support. Although the word “Reference” may not be used any longer, an on-demand librarian assistance service is available through the Main Desk. Help from librarians is available on a walk-in basis 10 am to 4 pm each weekday. Or make an appointment on the Library’s webpage. Get focused attention for your individual or group research. Here are some of the librarians who are available to help you:

 

Dana removed its Reference Desk after carefully researching the library literature and conducting wide-ranging discussions among Library faculty and staff. The Circulation Desk then morphed into the central location for all services and became the Main Desk.

Staffed by Lesley Boucher (supervisor), John Printon, Brenda Nelson, Colin McClung and Craig Chalone, with the help of student assistants, the Main Desk is the place to find help for all your library needs. Contact them at 656-2200 to get started.

Active Orientations for New Residents Conducted at Dana

Every summer, new residents enter postgraduate medical training programs at the University of Vermont Medical Center. An introduction to the Dana Medical Library is a standard orientation activity for these new residents. In the past, this consisted of a short lecture outlining library resources, services, and policies. Feedback from the residents revealed that they frequently retained little information from these orientations. This was due to the passive nature of the lecture and the fact that they were being overwhelmed with other information at the same time.

This year, the library redesigned and updated its new resident orientation. The old, passive lecture was replaced with an active learning exercise focused on a poster that highlighted essential Dana Medical Library resources and services. Participating residents spent one minute reading through the library poster, were asked to complete a brief poster survey and were encouraged to ask questions.

Nancy Bianchi-Poster

Active Learning Exercise Poster, Created by Nancy Bianchi and Gary Atwood

The results of this new orientation format were quite revealing. The poster prompted many questions and interesting on-the-spot conversations between residents and librarians. In addition, 80% of the new residents returned completed surveys. Most residents liked the format and felt that it was an effective way to introduce the library. Dana librarians will continue to study this passive turned active learning activity, and build on its success with other library presentations.

For more information, contact Library Associate Professor, Nancy Bianchi at or 656-4371.

Step Exam Resource Trial Results

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The Dana Medical Library and Collections Head Jeanene Light held a trial of the medical step exam USMLE EASY. This question and answer bank is intended to help students prepare for the USMLE licensing examinations.  It contains over 11,000 questions from Step 1, CK Step 2, and Step 3 and allows students to create a study plan, track their progress, and seek remediation from their own personal “dashboard.”

From November 25th to January 25th, 46 people created accounts and looked at this resource.  An equal number of people “sampled” Step 1 tests and Step 3 tests.  No one tried Step 2.

Individuals who created accounts were invited to answer a short survey to evaluate whether this resource was beneficial for USMLE test preparation. We learned, in general, that a high-quality resource would be widely used if made available electronically. Thank you to all the students who evaluated USMLE Easy online, during the two-month trial period and then completed the evaluative survey. For more information on the Trial and Survey, contact Jeanene Light at 656- 0521.

USMLE study guides now circulate longer

In response to survey feedback, the print USMLE study guides can now be checked out for three days, up from two hours. Following the three days, they may be renewed.  For any help with renewals or recalls, contact the Main Desk at 656-2200.

Find It Yourself or Ask a Librarian? Studies show medical librarian search gets better results and reduces costs

keypad&stethoscopeHealth care providers are incorporating more evidence-based practice skills and information sources into their patient care. When providers recognize an uncertainty in determining a diagnosis or treatment plan, they frequently turn to available knowledge sources. At University of Vermont/Fletcher Allen Health Care many providers and professionals turn to Library–licensed sources such as UpToDate, DynaMed, and Nursing Reference Center as their first stop in finding the evidence to answer a patient care question. These sources helpfully provide the “strength of recommendation” based on accepted standards of appraisal of research studies. The typical duration of a search session on DynaMed or UpToDate is less than five minutes, which is manageable at or near the point of care. When those sources do not answer the question adequately either because the latest findings are too new, or because the patient situation and values are too complex, clinicians often seek the primary literature through PubMed. In doing so, some find the search frustrating and time-consuming. If you are among those who need a potentially time-consuming and complex search of the primary literature, consider requesting a literature search from Dana Library medical librarians.

In a randomized trial, information retrieval searches performed by a medical librarian for complex clinical questions were faster and retrieved more favorable results when compared to physician self-searches. The librarians answered the question in 13 minutes compared to 20 minutes for physicians searching on their own. The physicians reported that the librarian results contained a higher level of evidence and had a greater impact on patient care than physician self-searches.1

In a controlled study, patient cases were presented at morning report with a medical librarian in attendance. The librarian performed a literature search on questions that arose and disseminated the findings to the attending physician and presenting resident. The control patients were drawn from patient records and matched for age and primary and secondary diagnoses. The study results included association with reduced hospital length of stay (LOS) for the case group. LOS differed by 2 days between matched cases and controls (3 days vs. 5 days, P < 0.024). Median total hospital charges were $7,045 for the intervention group, and $10,663 for the control group. 2

In these studies, the librarian-conducted literature search saved physician time, reduced hospital costs, and may have improved patient outcomes. UVM and Fletcher Allen physicians, residents, nurses, therapists, and others may receive help finding the literature to answer clinical questions, develop guidelines, and do background research for presentations. To request a literature search or consultation, go to Ask a Librarian on the Dana website to get help by phone, email, or in person.

1. McGowan J, Hogg W, Campbell C, Rowan M. Just-in-time information improved decision-making in primary care: a randomized controlled trial. PLoS ONE. 2008;3(11):e3785.

2. Banks DE, Shi R, Timm DF, et al. Decreased hospital length of stay associated with presentation of cases at morning report with librarian support. J Med Libr Assoc. Oct 2007;95(4):381-387.

Marianne Burke, MLS AHIP
Director, Dana Medical Library
marianne.burke@uvm.edu

Nationally Normed Survey Highlights Student and Faculty Success at Dana

LibQUAL_Logo_100px_highIn April 2013 the Dana Medical Library and Bailey-Howe Library made the LIbQual+ Survey available to UVM and Fletcher Allen faculty, staff, and students. Thank you to the 942 individuals who completed the survey.

The Dana Medical Library is committed to providing high quality medical and health sciences information and services to our patrons. One tool available to libraries for assessing service quality is the LibQual+ Survey. The U.S. Association for Research Libraries developed and rigorously tested this web-based survey. It has been used by more than 1,200 libraries, including University of Massachusetts, Northeastern University, University of Connecticut, University of Rhode Island, and SUNY Stony Brook.

The survey asked for patrons to indicate their minimum acceptable service level, their desired service level, and the level of service they perceive for 22 attributes.

The three attributes that Dana Library patrons were most satisfied with were:

  1. Employees who are consistently courteous
  2. Willingness to help users
  3. Readiness to respond to users’ questions.

Dana Library patrons indicated that their three most desired service attributes are:

  1. Print and/or electronic journal collections I require for my work
  2. The electronic information resources I need
  3. Making electronic resources accessible from my home or office

Mean scores for Dana Library services exceeded the minimum acceptable service level for all 22 attributes, including the three most desired attributes listed above.

Dana Medical Library also has data from its 2009 LibQual+ survey. Almost all scores were higher in 2013, but two specific changes stand out. First, survey results from 2013 indicated an increased score for “Employees who have the knowledge to answer user questions.” Second, the scores for “Community space for group learning and group study,” while not large in 2009 or 2013, were higher in 2013.

Stay tuned for Dana Library’s plans to use the data from the 2013 LibQual+ Survey, including information gleaned from survey comments.

Donna O’Malley, MLS
donna.omalley@uvm.edu

Scholarly Communications Corner: New NIH Public Access Compliance

NIH

By Jeanene Light, MLS

As most National Institute of Health (NIH) Principal Investigators (PI’s) and authors have heard, beginning in Spring 2013, NIH may delay funds from grant-holders not in compliance with the public access policies. The public policy requires all peer-reviewed articles published with direct NIH support to report PMCID numbers within 12 months of publication.

MyNCBI has been adapted to serve PI’s as a tool for determining compliance and for reporting PubMed Central (PMC) articles. Author-researchers can “associate” their publications with their NIH grants, track their compliance in PMC, and create bibliographies for reporting to the NIH. It is as simple as signing into MyNCBI with an eRA Commons username and password.

The University of Vermont’s Sponsored Projects Administration (SPA) , and Jeanene Light, MLS, Dana Medical Library, have teamed up  to provide tools to assist PI’s and authors reach compliance. The Dana Medical Library’s research guide at: http://danaguides.uvm.edu/NIH-Public-Policy provides assistance in identifying journals that submit automatically to PMC, specifies procedures for submitting articles “manually”, and offers copyright transfer agreement advice.  The research guide also includes links to NIH FAQ’s and videos, as well as contact information for Ms. Light and SPA administrators.

Additionally, the Sponsored Project Administration office now has access to the Public Access Compliance Monitor which provides the current compliance status of all journal articles that NIH believes a particular grantee institution is responsible for under the terms of the Public Access Policy. In addition to classifying articles according to compliance status, the compliance monitor provides detailed information about each article: a full citation; associated grants and program directors/principal investigators (PDs/PIs); the PubMed ID and related IDs where available; and a link to the PubMed record. Institutions can also track the status of papers deposited into the NIH Manuscript Submission (NIHMS) system.

For a quick, eight minute video highlighting the changes and the procedures, watch the video produced by NYU’s Health Sciences Libraries: bit.ly/11Q39kY. If you have further questions, please contact Jeanene Light or your SPA administrator.

Scholarly Communications Corner is a new column in the Dana Medical Library Newsletter featuring relevant information on a variety of scholarly communications topics from open access to digital repositories.

Continuing Medical Education Through Dana Resources

cme

By Fred Pond, MLS

Are you looking for low-cost, convenient ways to earn continuing medical education credit (CME)? Try Dana’s resource-rich list of databases and websites. This list offers access to a variety of clinical and medical education resources, and in some instances, CME credit may be obtained without costly out-of-town travel and fees.

Up-To-Date

Check out the popular UpToDate point-of-care database featuring quick access to current medical practices and recommendations. In fact, as you search for answers to patient care questions, UpToDate saves the topics for a later review, and offers continuing education credit by submitting the results to the appropriate accrediting organization.

Those organizations include American Medical Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, and American Academy of Physician Assistants, among others.

Activating UpToDate for Continuing Education Credit

  • Visit Dana Medical Library Home page, clicking on Articles & Databases under the FIND column.
  • Click on “UpToDate with CME” selection under the Clinical Databases section.
  • At the prompt, enter your UVM netID and password.  At that point register with UpToDate, indicating the type of continuing education you desire (MD/DO, Nurse Practitioner, Physician Assistants, etc).

UpToDate will keep track of the appropriate continuing education process for your professional role. Periodically, you will need to submit the accumulated credit to your professional organization.

Natural Standard

The Natural Standard database offers trustworthy information on complementary and alternative therapies, diets, exercise and nutrition. Natural Standard aggregates from PubMed, CancerLit, the Cochrane database and other trusted databases of the health sciences professional literature to create monographs and systematic reviews of supplements, vitamins and minerals, foods, and diets. At the heart of Natural Standard lies evidence-based systematic reviews, that both inform patient care and provide the content for a growing number of CE/CME topics. Providers can earn credit by reading this topics and then completing a brief quiz.

Natural Standard may not be as popular or as well known as UpToDate, but it offers an Evidence-Based Grading system that applies scientific evidence to alternative therapies. The World Health Organization has named Natural Standard “the best and most authoritative web site available on herbal medicines.”

Mobile App for Natural Standard

Natural Standard is also available as a Mobile app via Skyscape, a smartphone application offering a broad array of health-oriented applications, including DynaMed, RX Drugs, and several other health sciences applications. See below for instructions to receive Natural Standard on your smartphone, making it even easier to receive CME credit while you use your mobile device to answer patient care questions.

Natural Standard MobileActivating Natural Standard on your Smartphone

  • Click on Mobile Apps on the Dana Medical Library Home page, scroll down to Drugs section, to reach instructions for Natural Standard.
  • You will need to install Skyscape prior to Natural Standard, copying an authorization code that the company has sent you via your email request.

CME from the Journal Literature

Simply keeping current by reading professional journal articles can result in CME credit, and Dana Medical Library subscribes to thousands of journals online.  Journals including JAMA, BMJ, and Pediatrics require a quick registration for access to their CME resources.

According to the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), a journal-based CME activity must include reading the article, completing a learner-directed activity offered by the provider, and answering a pre-determined set of questions or completing tasks relating to the content of the article.

In this brief article, we’ve focused on just a few trustworthy, Dana Medical Library licensed resources that offer continuing education via the web. Call or email the Reference Desk at 656-2201 for more information on other reliable sources.

Journals and Databases Provide Continuing Education Opportunities

Browsing the journal literature is a great way to keep up to date in your profession, but did you know it’s possible to receive low-cost continuing education credit from journals available through Dana Medical Library? In addition to being a resource for higher education, research and clinical care information, databases and journals may be used to earn continuing education credit. You can even choose the topic for which you wish to earn credit.

CINAHL, the reference database for nursing & allied health journal literature, has two methods for getting Continuing Nursing Education (CNE) credit:

  • Identify journal articles that include CNE in a topic of your choice. To do this, first search for a topic – endoscopy nursing, for example – then simply limit the search to CEU as the publication type – at this writing, fifteen articles featuring CNE credit were found, on just endoscopy nursing. Choose one of the articles that interests you, read the article, complete the evaluation form, and follow the instructions at the end to submit for credit, and you’re done. Some journals offer free CEUs and frequently, if you have a personal subscription to the journal, the fee is waived. Sometimes, however, there is a fee for submission.
  • Use CINAHL Education modules. Register at no charge at ceu.cinahl.com to select from a number of different topics, representing a broad selection of practice areas. Review the course materials online, practice with an interactive review program and when you wish, take the online test to demonstrate your knowledge. Certificates may be printed from this web site and a designated person, such as your nurse educator, will receive an email upon your successful completion of the module.

Contact Dana Library Reference for searching tips in CINAHL or other questions about using Dana Library’s resources in earning continuing education credit.

Next issue: Using Dana Library resources for Continuing Medical Education (CME) credits.

Fred Pond, MLS

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