Connecting to the Library from Off-campus

laptop-820274_1920 (2)Academic health science library users, like students and faculty, often bring their work home with them and need to access the library remotely to do their work. Library resources are easily accessible with a UVM NetID by clicking on the “Connect From Off-Campus” button on Dana’s homepage.  Here is how you can gain access:

You will be prompted to log in with your UVM NetID.  Once you’ve logged in, you’ll return to the Dana Medical Library homepage, but with one small change – the URL should now include the words “ezproxy.uvm.edu.”  EZproxy is a service that lets websites know that you are coming from UVM and can get access to the resources we subscribe to.  Now, you’ll be able to access library resources like databases, ejournals and ebooks.  Want a visual guide to this process?  Check out our tutorial video.

Not sure what you are looking for or need more help?  Dana Medical Library also offers Research Guides and Tutorials that you can view from anywhere, anytime.  See our full list of Research Guides in different subject areas to get started.  If you need help using PubMed, CINAHL, or EndNote, we have a guide specifically for tutorials.  Keep in mind that as long as the library is open, you can talk to us virtually via chat or give us a call!

Learn More about Dana’s Virtual Dissection Table

anatomage-image_resizedDid you know that the Dana Medical Library has a virtual dissection table called an Anatomage Table? This Table is an advanced visualization system for anatomy education that uses touch screen capabilities. Just recently updated with the latest software, the Table’s screen is designed to fit a life-sized image of the human body. Images can be manipulated to show different anatomical sections with the ability to rotate and view the body or part from all angles. Layers of the body can be removed, certain sections isolated, and cross-sections made, all with pinning, labeling, and color-coding capabilities, among many other functions.

Professors and students have the ability to save a manipulated image for teaching purposes, examinations, or presentations. The Table provides curriculum-based tools, import/export capabilities, and an extensive archive of virtual images: full body and regional, CT scans, Histology, and case studies. The Table also has projection capabilities when hooked up to a separate computer and screen system.

If you are interested in learning more and exploring the uses of the Anatomage Table, please contact Kate Bright to set up a training session. Trainings show you the basics for use of the Table. Once you receive training, your name will be put on the permission list at Dana’s Main Desk. Once you are on the list, you can drop in and use the Table anytime the library is open and the classroom available. Or you can reserve the room ahead of time by contacting Kate.

Library Workshops Support Important Systematic Reviews

Gray Lit photo

Systematic reviews are an integral component of evidence-based healthcare, but they can be hard to define. According to the Cochrane Library, a systematic review “is a high-level overview of primary research on a particular research question that tries to identify, select, synthesize and appraise all high quality research evidence relevant to that question in order to answer it.” (http://community-archive.cochrane.org/about-us/evidence-based-health-care) Like all quality research studies, the protocol used to conduct a systematic review must be spelled out in advance to minimize bias and to ensure that the review can be replicated by another group. Because of the rigor involved, systematic reviews can take several months to complete and usually involve two or more researchers. When done correctly, however, they can provide very reliable evidence for health care providers.

A quick search of PubMed shows that approximately 223 healthcare related systematic reviews have been completed here at the University of Vermont and more are ongoing. Some most recent examples of these reviews are on topics like Physiological Genomics (J. Hudziak), Diabetes Research (M. Cushman), Clinical Pediatrics (S. Yeager), and Sports and Health (B. Beynnon). In an effort to support these projects, and other like them, Dana Medical Library offered a series of three systematic review workshops this spring:

  • Introduction to Systematic Reviews – led by Donna O’Malley and Gary Atwood, provided an overview of the elements that make up a systematic review and some of the issues that researchers encounter.
  • Searching for Systematic Reviews – led by Donna O’Malley, showed researchers how to find existing systematic reviews as examples.
  • Going Gray: How to Find Gray Literature – led by Nancy Bianchi and Gary Atwood, outlined the role that gray literature plays in the systematic review process and reviewed potential sources that researchers can search.

The workshops were attended by faculty members, researchers, and students – many of whom are either at the initial stages of their own systematic review or anticipating one in the not too distant future.

Given the positive reaction to this first round of systematic review workshops, the Reference Librarians at Dana hope to offer them again in the future. Of course, researchers can also contact their liaison for help with their own research in the meantime. For more information on workshops at Dana, contact Gary Atwood at 656-4488.

Print Journals on the Move

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Beginning August 7th, over 1,300 linear feet of print journals has been packed up and transferred out of the Dana Medical Library. Why? You may ask.

The Dana Medical Library is, increasingly, home to electronic journals…thousands of them, in fact, and increasingly, students and researchers prefer the convenience and 24/7 access of ejournals over print.

What hasn’t changed, though, is the continuing desire and need for library space- individual, quiet study, collaborative group study, and classrooms – for a variety of teaching and learning activities.

To that end, the University Libraries recently licensed extensive collections of electronic “backfiles” of those titles that were not originally available in electronic form before the years dating approximately 1986-1995.

These purchases made it possible for the Library to transfer many hundreds of titles out of the library to remote storage areas, or to give them away to other libraries. Before they were earmarked for transfer, though, staff performed a careful examination to compare the print and electronic titles for the following elements:

  • All print content available in electronic format
  • All charts, illustrations and graphics legible
  • All supplements and added materials included
  • Format of content- PDF or HTML or both?
  • Editorial staff directories included
  • Advertisements and Announcements included

The electronic content was found to be acceptable in almost all backfiles evaluated. The only content that was regularly omitted was the last element- advertisements and announcements of upcoming meetings and conferences. Since that last information has a short “shelf life” of relevant interest, this seemed a reasonable trade-off to gain both physical space in the crowded library and provide additional electronic content to our users.

In the next few years Dana Medical Library will see many changes to its physical space to accommodate the diverse ways people in the health sciences learn, study and research. Making room for these changes by moving to an increasingly electronic environment is the first step in this exciting evolution of libraries.

For more information on the Library’s journal shift, contact Jeanene Light at (802) 656-0521.


Isn’t All Learning “Active Learning?”

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Students at the University of South Alabama College of Medicine engaged in group work

If you do anything related to education, you have probably heard of the term “active learning”. People write books and articles about it. They give presentations extolling its benefits. If you search for active learning in Google, you’ll get over 265,000 results. It seems like active learning is everywhere, but what does it really mean?

When people talk about active learning, they are usually referring to a style of teaching where students are encouraged to engage with the material they are studying in some manner. Students usually do this through reading, writing, talking, listening, and reflecting in some way with course content. For example, a teacher might have students work on a case study to see how they would apply concepts they have read about. There are several other active learning strategies that can be used in addition to case studies such as discussion groups, role-playing, and journal writing. Ultimately, the goal is to move away from a scenario where the teacher spends the whole class lecturing, while students passively sit and listen.

The new Larner Classroom at Dana Medical Library is being built to accommodate 120 students at small tables optimizing the team-based or active learning philosophy. The space will feature flexible furniture to support a variety of learning configurations, multiple projection screens, an advanced video and sound system, and active acoustics to accommodate both small and large groups.

Incorporating active learning into a class takes planning and time, but the results are usually worth it. Studies have shown that students in active learning classes learn and retain more information, participate more in class, and do better overall in terms of grades. Teachers usually report that they benefit from active learning too. After all, what more could a teacher ask for then to have a class full of engaged and successful students?

Nationally Normed Survey Highlights Student and Faculty Success at Dana

LibQUAL_Logo_100px_highIn April 2013 the Dana Medical Library and Bailey-Howe Library made the LIbQual+ Survey available to UVM and Fletcher Allen faculty, staff, and students. Thank you to the 942 individuals who completed the survey.

The Dana Medical Library is committed to providing high quality medical and health sciences information and services to our patrons. One tool available to libraries for assessing service quality is the LibQual+ Survey. The U.S. Association for Research Libraries developed and rigorously tested this web-based survey. It has been used by more than 1,200 libraries, including University of Massachusetts, Northeastern University, University of Connecticut, University of Rhode Island, and SUNY Stony Brook.

The survey asked for patrons to indicate their minimum acceptable service level, their desired service level, and the level of service they perceive for 22 attributes.

The three attributes that Dana Library patrons were most satisfied with were:

  1. Employees who are consistently courteous
  2. Willingness to help users
  3. Readiness to respond to users’ questions.

Dana Library patrons indicated that their three most desired service attributes are:

  1. Print and/or electronic journal collections I require for my work
  2. The electronic information resources I need
  3. Making electronic resources accessible from my home or office

Mean scores for Dana Library services exceeded the minimum acceptable service level for all 22 attributes, including the three most desired attributes listed above.

Dana Medical Library also has data from its 2009 LibQual+ survey. Almost all scores were higher in 2013, but two specific changes stand out. First, survey results from 2013 indicated an increased score for “Employees who have the knowledge to answer user questions.” Second, the scores for “Community space for group learning and group study,” while not large in 2009 or 2013, were higher in 2013.

Stay tuned for Dana Library’s plans to use the data from the 2013 LibQual+ Survey, including information gleaned from survey comments.

Donna O’Malley, MLS
donna.omalley@uvm.edu

Top Dana Research Guides for 2013

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Research guides developed by Dana Librarians help you find key resources for your area of interest. Some guides focus on a clinical specialty, while others focus on types of resources, such as mobile apps or study guides. The Mobile Apps subject guide was the most popular subject guide on the Dana website in FY’13. See a full list of research guides for health sciences here (http://researchguides.uvm.edu/dana).

Top Dana Subject Guides (July 1, 2012-June 30, 2013)

Subject Guide

Views

Mobile Apps

4125

Nursing Resources for Clinical Practice

3061

Anatomy of a Scholarly Journal Article

2855

Clinical Care

1973

USMLE Study Guides

1461

Family Medicine

1391

Endnote and EndNote Web

1048

Anesthesiology

1023