Personal Health Tools

floss1Ever wonder about the proper way to floss your teeth? The personal health tools at healthfinder.gov can show you how to floss, assess your risk of diabetes or calculate how much you spend on alcohol each month.

healthfinder.gov is a government Web site that presents health information and tools for individual use, either for yourself or a loved one. According to the site’s description it “has resources on a wide range of health topics selected from over 1,600 government and non-profit organizations to bring you the best, most reliable health information on the Internet.”

One of the most interesting sections of the site contains a variety of personal health tools, “free interactive tools to check your health, get personalized advice, and keep track of your progress.” A great place to start is the MyHealthfinder, which offers you several tools of interest based on your age and gender [information provided byU.S. Preventive Services Task Force].

While MedlinePlus is still the gold standard in consumer health information, it often works best when you approach it with a particular topic in mind. On the other hand, if you are looking for personalized general wellness information, either for yourself or your patients, healthfinder.gov is a great place to start.

Floss those pearly whites! by /*dave*/ used in accordance with the Creative Commons license.

Dana Wants to Hear from YOU!

libqual_logo_100px_highThe Dana Medical Library cares about what you think. We want your voice to be at the heart of our planning and assessment efforts as we evaluate library services, including such things as electronic journal access, library employees’ ability to solve problems, the new library web page, and the quality of the physical facilities.

On Monday, April 6th, Dana will launch an electronic survey, LibQUAL+ ™, to evaluate the library, and to benchmark our collection, services and facilities with other libraries.

LibQual is a nationally-normed survey developed by the Texas A&M University Libraries in partnership with the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). The survey gauges library users’ opinions of the resources and services provided by the library. The survey includes three general areas: Affect of Service, or how patrons felt their needs were met by staff; Information Control, or how easily patrons are able to find what they are looking for; and Library as Place, or how well the location works for study and research.

The Dana Medical Library participated in the LibQUAL+ ™ survey in April 2005. At that time, the Library’s highest ratings were in the area of Affect of Service. The area of Information Control presented a different picture. Three out of 9 questions reflected inadequate performance. For example, in answer to the question of whether journal collections were sufficient for one’s work, respondents, particularly faculty and graduate students, rated the collection as inadequate. The physical Library was also identified as below standard. Since that time, the Dana Medical Library has made several changes. Most obviously, the Library moved to a new facility. Another important change has been the significant increase in the number of electronic journals available. How important are these changes? What additional changes should be considered? What should not be changed? We want to know!

Please consider participating in this survey at http://library.uvm.edu/surveys/. Sample responses indicate it takes approximately 10 minutes to complete.

Your investment of time now will be greatly appreciated, and will help to shape the future of the Dana Medical Library.

Find Out More About Top Ranking Journals

jcrhdr

Are you thinking of submitting a manuscript to Plant Cell but don’t know how high that journal is ranked in your field? Do you want to know more about the top journals in your field?

Journal Citation Reports can help! This resource allows you to evaluate and compare journals using citation data drawn from over 7,500 scholarly and technical journals from 3,300 publishers in over 60 countries. It covers the areas of science, technology and the social sciences. Journal Citation Reports displays the:

  • Most frequently cited journals in a field
  • Highest impact journals in a field
  • Largest journals in a field

Citation and article counts may indicate how frequently current researchers are using individual journals. By tabulating and aggregating citation and article counts, JCR offers one perspective for journal evaluation and comparison.

To use JCR, simply click on Articles & Databases on the home page and then go to Web of Science. Once there, click on the yellow tab at the top that reads Additional Resources. A link to Journal Citation Reports is in the upper left-hand corner.

Be aware that JCR is not the only way to evaluate a journal’s value or impact on a field. ISI, the makers of JCR, offer valuable advice on using this resource wisely, so consider reading this before you proceed.

Journal Changes for 2009

medphoto_dsc1135_uncroppedEvery year Library faculty and staff work hard to assess the journal collection to make sure it meets the needs of patrons. Indicators such as journal usage statistics, impact factors, and ranking of a journal title within its subject area assist the Library in deciding which journal titles to add, change to online subscription, or, in some cases, cancel. The attached document lists all changes in the journal collection for 2009.

We welcome feedback! Please comment below, or contact the reference desk at danaref@uvm.edu or 656-4143.

Top Ten Most Useful Websites for Personal Health

logobig1The Medical Library Association each year evaluates and lists the top ten sites for personal health use. Whether you are recommending a site to a patient, or using one for yourself, these ten are “best bets!”

(Sites are listed in alphabetical, NOT ranked, order.)

The Consumer and Patient Health Information Section (CAPHIS) of MLA evaluates web sites based on the following criteria: credibility, sponsorship/authorship, content, audience, currency, disclosure, purpose, links, design, interactivity, and disclaimers.

Lunch and Learn Series Spring Schedule

Bring your lunch and your questions to the Dana Library Conference Room for our Brown Bag Lunch and Learn sessions, Wednesdays at noon.

EndNote

Learn the basics of EndNote. This demonstration could include creating a list of references in EndNote, downloading records from online databases such as PubMed, creating a bibliography, or adding citations to a paper using EndNote and Microsoft Word. The last 15 minutes is reserved for in-depth questions.

Wednesday
January 21, 2008
Noon-1pm

CINAHL
CINAHL® (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) has switched to a new interface. Find out how to search using CINAHL subject headings, and enjoy the many searching improvements included in this new version.

Wednesday
January 28, 2009
Noon-1pm

Search the Biomedical Literature with PubMed or OvidMEDLINE
Bring questions about search techniques for using this leading database of the medical literature.

Wednesday
February 4, 2009
Noon-1pm

Keep Current With News & Research:RSS, blogs, and tagging.
Come with specific journals, subjects, or authors that you’d like to create alerts for, and we’ll help you set them up!

Wednesday
February 11, 2009
Noon-1pm

EndNote
Learn the basics of EndNote. This demonstration could include creating a list of references in EndNote, downloading records from online databases such as PubMed, creating a bibliography, or adding citations to a paper using EndNote and Microsoft Word. The last 15 minutes is reserved for in-depth questions.

Wednesday
February 18, 2009
Noon-1pm

Find Answers Quickly At The Point Of Care
Bring your clinical questions to explore databases designed to directly answer those questions. Databases may include UpToDate, Dynamed, Micromedex, Medline and CINAHL.

Wednesday
February 25, 2009
Noon-1pm

CINAHL
CINAHL® (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) has switched to a new interface. Find out how to search using CINAHL subject headings, and enjoy the many searching improvements included in this new version.

Wednesday
March 4, 2009
Noon-1pm

Search the Biomedical Literature with PubMed or OvidMEDLINE
Bring questions about search techniques for using this leading database of the medical literature.

Wednesday
March 18, 2009
Noon-1pm

EndNote
Learn the basics of EndNote. This demonstration could include creating a list of references in EndNote, downloading records from online databases such as PubMed, creating a bibliography, or adding citations to a paper using EndNote and Microsoft Word. The last 15 minutes is reserved for in-depth questions.

Wednesday
March 25, 2009
Noon-1pm

Google Scholar
Share favorite sites and handy tips.

Wednesday
April 1, 2009
Noon-1pm

NIH Public Access Policy Compliance
Review procedures and tools at UVM.

Wednesday
April 8, 2009
Noon-1pm

EndNote
Learn the basics of EndNote. This demonstration could include creating a list of references in EndNote, downloading records from online databases such as PubMed, creating a bibliography, or adding citations to a paper using EndNote and Microsoft Word. The last 15 minutes is reserved for in-depth questions.

Wednesday
April 15, 2009
Noon-1pm

Our workshops are open to UVM and FAHC faculty, staff and students.

We can custom design a workshop for you, for your class, or for your workgroup. Workshops can be held in the Library or in another more convenient location for you. Call 656-4415 or email donna.omalley@uvm.edu for more information or to schedule a session.

Workshops on these topics are readily available, or request a customized combination of topics:

PubMed
Google
Ovid Medline
CINAHL
EndNote
PsycInfo
Electronic Journal Troubleshooting
Evidence-Based Practice Tools
Navigating the Virtual Library    Citation and E-Journal Troubleshooting
MD Consult
FirstCONSULT
Clinical Pharmacology
UpToDate
Advanced MEDLINE
Consumer Health on the Web
Web of Science

Questions? Call 656-2201, or send an email to danaref@uvm.edu.

CINAHL Database Changes

Beginning in December 2008, CINAHL® (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) will be available on EBSCOhost rather than OVID.

CINAHL® is the most comprehensive resource for nursing and allied health literature going back to 1982. While considered one of the most important sources for nurses, it is also used by other allied health professions such as physical therapy, dentistry, dental hygiene, occupational therapy, athletic training, audiology, speech therapy and more. CINAHL®  indexes over 2500 journals covering nursing, allied health, biomedicine, alternative/complementary medicine, consumer health and health sciences librarianship.

CINAHL® subject headings are used to index the literature contained in the database. These subject headings were developed to reflect the terminology used by nursing and allied health professionals. CINAHL® subject headings follow the structure of the Medical Subject Headings, or MeSH, used by the National Library of Medicine.

For years the Dana Medical Library has subscribed to CINAHL® through OVID, and nurses and other patrons have become accustomed to searching the database using these subject headings in ways specific to the OVID platform. Starting December 2008, CINAHL® will be available through a different platform with a different interface. But just because the look and feel has changed, doesn’t mean the database has! You can still search using CINAHL® subject headings, and many searching improvements are included in this new version.

The Dana Medical Library will be offering training in the new interface in January. Stay tuned for dates and times. Meanwhile, you can still access the old version by clicking on OVID on our home page until December 31st, 2008. If you need assistance on the EBSCOhost version of CINAHL, the Ebsco CINAHL Support Center has many helpful guides and FAQs. You can also contact the reference desk at 656-2201 or danaref@uvm.edu.

Report Problems with Electronic Resources

eresourceHave you noticed the purple button on the Dana Home Page or E-journal list web page?
Click on the button to fill out and submit the form whenever you can’t get to the full text of a journal article or database that you know the Library owns. Library staff will respond at least by the next business day to advise you how to access the article, or will work to resolve the problem. We want to improve your access to full text when and where you need it. We realize that it takes effort to fill out a form when you are having a problem accessing a much needed article, and we appreciate that effort as it means we can improve access to electronic resources for everyone.

Finding the full-text content you require can be tricky. The UVM Libraries strive to make our subscribed e-content as accessible as possible, but technical problems do persist. So, the next time the catalog says we have a journal article online but you can’t get to it, or you can’t connect to a database you think we own, please take the time to Report an E-Resource Problem.

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