Connecting to the Library from Off-campus

laptop-820274_1920 (2)Academic health science library users, like students and faculty, often bring their work home with them and need to access the library remotely to do their work. Library resources are easily accessible with a UVM NetID by clicking on the “Connect From Off-Campus” button on Dana’s homepage.  Here is how you can gain access:

You will be prompted to log in with your UVM NetID.  Once you’ve logged in, you’ll return to the Dana Medical Library homepage, but with one small change – the URL should now include the words “ezproxy.uvm.edu.”  EZproxy is a service that lets websites know that you are coming from UVM and can get access to the resources we subscribe to.  Now, you’ll be able to access library resources like databases, ejournals and ebooks.  Want a visual guide to this process?  Check out our tutorial video.

Not sure what you are looking for or need more help?  Dana Medical Library also offers Research Guides and Tutorials that you can view from anywhere, anytime.  See our full list of Research Guides in different subject areas to get started.  If you need help using PubMed, CINAHL, or EndNote, we have a guide specifically for tutorials.  Keep in mind that as long as the library is open, you can talk to us virtually via chat or give us a call!

EndNote X9 is Here

endnote_x9_imageresizedThe newest version of EndNote – EndNote X9 – is now available. This new version has many new features to help you in your research. For example, there are new templates for online media types like blog posts and Twitter. There is also a new function called “Manuscript Matcher” that helps you identify journals that might be interested in publishing your work. EndNote X9 also has enhanced sharing features that allow you to share more of your library with other EndNote users.

New users can download EndNote X9 from the UVM software download site. You will need a UVM NetID and password to download EndNote. Current EndNote users can update to the new version of EndNote from within EndNote X8.  A special note for Mac users: MacOS versions 10.12 (Sierra), 10.13 (High Sierra), and 10.14 (Mojave) are programmed to save the contents of the “Documents” folder in iCloud if you have iCloud enabled for your computer. Do not save your EndNote libraries or your Word documents in iCloud. Doing so will eventually corrupt your EndNote library and disrupt the link between your library and Word document. More detailed instructions are available to help you work around this issue.

Dana Librarians are available to help you with downloading or upgrading to EndNote X9 as well as any other questions you may have. We offer a drop-in clinic on Mondays from 2 to 4 pm. You can also go to Dana’s EndNote training webpage to make an appointment with a librarian at another time that fits your schedule. EndNote is a powerful research tool. Let us help you get the most out of it!

Dana Offers MedEdPORTAL as a Way of Finding Health Sciences Curriculum Resources

mededportal imageMedEdPORTAL is your gateway to health sciences education resources. Many people turn to PubMed first, but this may not be the best choice in many situations. There are two primary reasons for this. One, there may not be anything in PubMed on the topic. Two, PubMed mostly indexes articles about education topics, but not the actual curriculum materials themselves. In many cases, educators would be better off searching another database that focuses exclusively on health sciences education materials – MedEdPORTAL.

“MedEdPORTAL is an open access journal of teaching and learning resources in the health professions published by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).” Each article is actually a teaching or learning module that consists of a detailed description and the curriculum materials (e.g. PowerPoints, videos, quiz questions, etc.). These materials can be downloaded and used for free. Each module has also been implemented and evaluated so that educators can get a sense of how successful the module was and what potential changes they should consider when adopting it for their own classes.

Educators can also submit their own teaching and learning modules to MedEdPORTAL. All of the information needed in the submission process can be found on the author’s page. Please contact a librarian at Dana Medical Library if you need assistance with either submitting to or searching MedEdPORTAL.

Director’s Viewpoint

What’s in a Name?

Marianne Burke, Dana Medical Library
Marianne Burke, Dana Medical Library

What do the words Circulation or Reference mean to you? A few years ago we took down the large letter signs over the service desks at the front of the Library that said “Circulation” and “Reference”. The terms seemed obscure, especially in a medical library (Circulation, defined as the continuous movement of blood through the heart and blood vessels.)  “Circulation” was where library users checked out and returned books or journal volumes.  “Reference” was the desk with the knowledgeable medical librarian who readily found answers to questions as they arose.

Since research journals, textbooks, and multi-format media are now available on mobile devices and desktops, thousands of downloads of UVM Libraries licensed content are completed each year without a visit to the brick and mortar library. Along with electronic delivery of services (article delivery requests for example), many queries are now answered remotely .

Yet, students, faculty, and clinicians do visit the library every month. They come to the library to study, seek services, find a book, and consult with a librarian (See “Dana Survey asks…” article). In fact, 13,409 items were checked out in FY2015.  As we evaluated services and library use, we learned that most questions, including topic-based collection queries, were answered effectively by the professional staff at the front service desk. Librarians, as liaisons to medical & health science campus departments and education programs, are frequently out of the library.

In January, the front desk (formerly known as Circulation) was officially renamed the Main Desk.  The Reference Desk was taken down, replaced with on-demand librarians for complex queries and research consultation by appointment.  (See Main Desk article.)

Medical libraries are changing, and our names are changing too.  Does the term “reference librarian” still apply without a reference desk? Many academic health science libraries don’t think so.  Depending on their position, librarians are called knowledge managers, research informaticians, information literacy specialists, and informationists.

What do you think? What’s in a name?  Do you prefer the traditional nomenclature and services of the library or can you envision with us an exciting, unfolding future?

Marianne Burke MA AHIP, Library Associate Professor

Director, Dana Medical Library

Library Main Desk helps more than ever

MainDeskImagecropped
Main Desk staff assisting patron

After carefully researching the library literature and conducting wide-ranging discussions among Library faculty and staff, Dana closed and removed its Reference Desk in January. Although the word “Reference” may not be used any longer, an on-demand librarian assistance service is still available through the Main Desk. In addition, the Main Desk now answers a variety of questions. Switching to a single service location maximizes library space and better serves patron needs while becoming the central point for help, information, and services at the Library. Stop at the Main Desk to find an e-journal or get started on a PubMed or CatQuest search on your topic!

Research Support

In 2015, the Main Desk staff encountered 1,840 reference questions and, in the first quarter of 2016 (January to March), the new single service Main Desk received 662 reference queries. Main Desk staff are now, more than ever, prepared to answer research questions. However, for more in-depth queries, staff can refer you to the on-demand librarian.

Assistance from librarians is available on a walk-in basis 10 am to 4 pm each weekday. Or make an appointment on the Library’s webpage. Get focused attention for individual or group research.

Student Curriculum and Technical Support

The Main Desk is also the place to go for curriculum support. Access and place materials on reserve, request articles through electronic article delivery and interlibrary loan, gain support for research, get help with database navigation and reserve group study spaces.  Also, check out books, media and print journals and borrow supplies like ethernet & power cables, standup desks, white boards & markers, and headphones.

Get help with technology for printing, scanning, copying, public computers, wireless access, and referral to external IT support. In addition, the library has a lost and found and can provide emergency cleanup supplies.

Staffed by Lesley Boucher (supervisor), John Printon, Brenda Nelson, Colin McClung and Craig Chalone, with the help of student assistants, the Main Desk is available to help you with all your library needs. Contact them at 656-2200 to get started.

Dana Survey asks, Who uses the library for What?

During the last week of February (Feb 23-28), Dana conducted a library survey to determine “Who is using the Dana Library?” and “For what purpose?”. Library faculty and staff distributed surveys to everyone entering the Library for one hour at different times on each day. The survey asked visitors to state why they were using the Library and allowed them to select more than one activity. A total of 268 surveys were distributed with 243 patrons completing the questionnaire. Of those surveyed, 90% (219) came to the library to study or do coursework and many of those individuals used their personal laptops. The following chart reveals more survey details:

WhoGraph

WhatGraph

As the chart above shows, our largest patron group was Medical Students (35%), followed by Other Undergraduate Students (28%). Our lowest Patron Group was UVM Med Center employees (2%). For Purpose of Visit, Study or Coursework (90%) was the most common reason and 70% of patrons preferred to use their laptops as opposed to the library computers.

Dana will use this information to plan programs and services at the Library. We will also compare this information with previous years’ patron studies and map trends in library usage. For more information, contact Donna O’Malley at 656-4415.

Step Exam Resource Trial Results

USMLEimage

The Dana Medical Library and Collections Head Jeanene Light held a trial of the medical step exam USMLE EASY. This question and answer bank is intended to help students prepare for the USMLE licensing examinations.  It contains over 11,000 questions from Step 1, CK Step 2, and Step 3 and allows students to create a study plan, track their progress, and seek remediation from their own personal “dashboard.”

From November 25th to January 25th, 46 people created accounts and looked at this resource.  An equal number of people “sampled” Step 1 tests and Step 3 tests.  No one tried Step 2.

Individuals who created accounts were invited to answer a short survey to evaluate whether this resource was beneficial for USMLE test preparation. We learned, in general, that a high-quality resource would be widely used if made available electronically. Thank you to all the students who evaluated USMLE Easy online, during the two-month trial period and then completed the evaluative survey. For more information on the Trial and Survey, contact Jeanene Light at 656- 0521.

USMLE study guides now circulate longer

In response to survey feedback, the print USMLE study guides can now be checked out for three days, up from two hours. Following the three days, they may be renewed.  For any help with renewals or recalls, contact the Main Desk at 656-2200.